Vegetarian Thanksgiving side dishes roundup

Thanksgiving is only a week away, and if you're still looking for some tasty, meat-free side dishes, I've got you covered, friends. Below is a collection of some of my favorite side dishes, just in time for the holidays. It just so happens that all are gluten-free, unless otherwise noted!

Vegan

Vegetarian

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Zucchini chips (or How to Eat a Whole Zucchini Without Really Trying)

These were thin and light enough that the breeze blew a couple out of my hand after I took a picture!

I read somewhere once that people crave crispy foods when they're angry because the crunch provides a physical release for stress. In that case, I must be angry all the time, because as long as I'm awake, there's a pretty good chance I'm craving something crunchy and salty.

And thanks to a recipe sent to me by my lovely mother-in-law, I've found a healthy, low-calorie way to satisfy that craving! Zucchini chips are easy to make (although they do take quite a while to bake in the oven), crispy, golden, and delicious. And since they require only a tiny spritz of oil, I can't imagine they'd rack up many calories at all. So what are you waiting for?

Click here for a printable recipe.

You will need:

  • Zucchini
  • Oil in spray form (I used olive oil in my Misto sprayer, but if you don't have one of those, I'd imagine any olive oil, coconut oil, or canola oil in spray form would work well.)
  • Kosher salt
  • Optional seasoning, such as garlic powder, crushed oregano, or chipotle powder

Steps:

  1. Preheat oven to 225° F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or non-stick foil and set aside.
  2. Slice the zucchini very thinly -- I recommend a mandoline slicer if you have one. Lay the zucchini slices between two paper towels for several minutes to draw out some of the moisture.
  3. Lay the zucchini slices in one layer on the baking tray. Spritz them with oil. Sprinkle lightly with salt (this will help draw out more moisture to make them crispy.) If desired, sprinkle with a tiny bit of seasoning (I used roasted garlic powder).
  4. Bake zucchini chips for 1-2 hours, depending on thickness of the slices. (I sliced mine at 2 mm and they took an hour and 20 minutes to get crispy.) You'll know they're done when they're golden brown and dry.

Supposedly, these last for three days in an airtight container, but I wouldn't know, since I downed them all in less than 10 minutes.

Spicy roasted okra (~3 servings)

Within the first year of living in Chapel Hill, I passed a culinary milestone: I tasted okra. Do we have okra in Pennsylvania? Yes, we do, but I never knew anyone who dared to make it. In fact, I grew up frightened of okra. My only connection to it was a cautionary tale, rehashed by my parents, of two unsuspecting, naive eaters being passed a slimy, gummy substance that made them both gag. I knew that trying okra could lead to dire consequences (everyone knows okra is a gateway veggie that usually leads to greener, often leafier produce), so I was in no hurry to try it myself.

But once an adult daughter moves away from her parents, she often rebels against her upbringing. Unsupervised and unapologetic, she will often take risks and experiment with things her parents may have frowned upon -- nay, gasped at -- back home. Okra, you say? Roasted and wrapped in crispy coating? Set me UP!

Truth be told, when roasted, okra is quite lovely. It lacks the mucus-like ooze (let's be honest, friends) of its boiled brethren and is instead crispy on the outside and pleasantly soft on the inside. Pair that with a spicy coating, and you've got a zesty, crunchy vegetable that will surprise even the most hesitant of okra-haters.

You will need:

  • 1 lb okra
  • 1/8 cup cornmeal
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1/2 to 1 tsp chipotle powder
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp coarse salt

Steps:

  1. Preheat the oven to 450˚ F.
  2. Rinse the okra and pat it dry with a towel to remove any remaining water.
  3. Using a paring knife and cutting board, slice off the stem ends and tips of the okra pods, and then slice the pods in half lengthwise. Place the okra halves in a large zipper bag. 
  4. Sprinkle the cornmeal, spices, and salt into the bag. Seal it up and shake it gently to coat the okra evenly.
  5. Spread the okra out on a baking pan lined with non-stick foil. Bake 18-20 minutes, turning once, or until the okra is crispy and starting to turn brown.

I based this recipe on one from The Fitchen, leaving out the jalapeños (I'm a wimp), adding garlic, and subbing cornmeal for the millet flour. Besides the flavor, what I really like about this recipe is that it doesn't require any oil! Although the slimy texture disappears after the okra is roasted, it does make the cornmeal coating stick to the raw vegetables, so no oil is necessary. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised by this recipe! I know Bryan and I were!